Author Topic: The Vouched Recipes Thread  (Read 18759 times)

K Frame

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Re: The Vouched Recipes Thread
« Reply #25 on: September 13, 2022, 07:45:27 AM »
Agreed. Making it again today.

Very cool! Glad that you like that recipe. It really was a winner for my family's dinner.

I may try making these again this winter for a good cold weather comfort meal.
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zxcvbob

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Re: Pea Soup
« Reply #26 on: January 20, 2023, 10:35:05 PM »
Spit Pea & Ham Soup

I've loved split pea & ham soup since I was a little kid. Loved it when my Mom would make it during the winter. It pairs great with grilled cheese sandwiches, too.

I've made some changes to my recipe over the years. I've dropped the carrots & celery (not a big fan) and have started adding a bag of frozen green peas near the end of cooking. Got that idea from a can of Trader Joe's soup years ago. Works nicely.

I made a batch over the weekend. Came out fantastic, except it's a tad bit sweeter than I like because I grabbed a chunk of sugar cured ham instead of salt cured and smoked. A dollop of sour cream helped mitigate that, though.



Ingredients

Pork neck bones or ham hocks
2 medium or 1 large onion (more is better)
Minced garlic (again, more is better)
2 quarts of low sodium chicken or vegetable broth
1 pound of salt cured smoked ham (you can use sugar cured, but it will be sweeter)
1 pound split green peas
2 bay leaves
Oregano
Basil
1 pound bag of frozen green peas

Instructions

Cover 1 to 2 pounds of smoked cured pork neck bones with water. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer for about 2 hours. You can use ham hocks but you’ll need to simmer for at least 3 to 4 hours to get the same level of flavor. Remove the neck bones and discard.

Dice the onion and sweat in a pan over low heat with vegetable oil and a heavy pinch of kosher salt. Sweat until onion becomes soft and translucent, about 10 to 15 minutes, stirring frequently.

Add the garlic and continue to sweat for another 5 minutes, stirring frequently.

Add the onions, garlic, split peas, and a quart of broth to the neck bone broth. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a medium simmer.

Add the bay leaves.

Cook for 1 to 2 hours (or until green peas are soft), adding more broth as necessary. The split peas will soak up quite a bit of broth.

When the peas have reached the desired softness, remove the bay leaves and use a vegetable masher or stick blender to thicken the soup.

Add oregano, basil, additional powdered garlic and salt (if necessary).

Add the diced ham and frozen peas. Cook for another 10 to 15 minutes.

Serve with a crusty bread, sour cream, or an olive oil and lemon juice emulsion as a drizzle

I made this last week while the server was down, so I had to make it from memory.  I used a pound of green split peas, 1.5 pounds of smoked neckbones, and half a 12 oz bag of frozen peas added near the end.  I used marjoram and a little thyme for the spices.  No diced ham, just the meat I picked from the neckbones, plus I added some carrots, celery, and a small diced potato.  I picked the carrots out and stick-blendered the peas and onions and celery.  Then added the carrots back in, and the potato, frozen peas, and the neck meat.  Cooked over very low heat until the potatoes were done.

I was amazed how much it thickened up overnight. (I know beans do that, but I didn't think this would because I'd blenderized it)   I have to add water to it when I reheat it.  There's still one serving left that I'll probably finish off tomorrow.
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K Frame

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Re: The Vouched Recipes Thread
« Reply #27 on: January 21, 2023, 07:43:01 AM »
Glad you liked it! A lot of the thickening of the soup was due to the neck bones, actually. Simmering them releases a lot of collagen from the bone and makes for a really nice, thick liquid.

I've not made this in a while. I need to make it, but it really needs to be good and cold out, and that's one thing this winter has not been so far.
Carbon Monoxide, sucking the life out of idiots, 'tards, and fools since man tamed fire.