Author Topic: Remember the wedding cake SCOTUS case?  (Read 721 times)

HankB

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Re: Remember the wedding cake SCOTUS case?
« Reply #25 on: December 14, 2022, 08:52:02 AM »
When comparing conservatives vs. liberals, I'm reminded of the Churchillian comparison of capitalism and socialism:  "The inherent vice of capitalism is the unequal sharing of blessings; the inherent virtue of socialism is the equal sharing of miseries."
Trump won in 2016. Democrats haven't been so offended since Republicans came along and freed their slaves.
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dogmush

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Re: Remember the wedding cake SCOTUS case?
« Reply #26 on: December 14, 2022, 10:38:54 AM »
A lot of truth there. I bet the conservatives in the 1760-1770s thought the progressives were weirdos for wanting independence from the British.

I'm pretty sure that the broadsheets of the time called them Nazi's.   >:D

charby

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Re: Remember the wedding cake SCOTUS case?
« Reply #27 on: December 14, 2022, 06:27:26 PM »
I'm pretty sure that the broadsheets of the time called them Nazi's.   >:D

 :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
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Pb

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Re: Remember the wedding cake SCOTUS case?
« Reply #28 on: December 14, 2022, 08:03:56 PM »
A lot of truth there. I bet the conservatives in the 1760-1770s thought the progressives were weirdos for wanting independence from the British.

From what I recall from my reading... the Americans were so used to governing themselves, they pretty much thought of themselves as having their own country already.  Then they started having disagreements with the British government.  The colonists considered themselves loyal subjects (who thought the King was really on their side).  The British responded to colonial complaints with repression, which killed off the loyalty man had felt previously.  The final straw was the confiscation of guns which lead to start of the war, pretty much spontaneously.

The Americans who fought in the revolution felt they were defending their own country, and were not Englishmen any more.

ConstitutionCowboy

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Re: Remember the wedding cake SCOTUS case?
« Reply #29 on: December 15, 2022, 10:46:04 AM »
Note from my wife:

"When it comes to feelings, when you disengage your brain, be prepared for misery."

Mrs. Woody
   "Knowing the past, I'll not surrender any arms and march less prepared into the future."   B.E.Wood

Hawkmoon

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Re: Remember the wedding cake SCOTUS case?
« Reply #30 on: December 15, 2022, 11:50:29 AM »
From what I recall from my reading... the Americans were so used to governing themselves, they pretty much thought of themselves as having their own country already.  Then they started having disagreements with the British government.  The colonists considered themselves loyal subjects (who thought the King was really on their side).  The British responded to colonial complaints with repression, which killed off the loyalty man had felt previously.  The final straw was the confiscation of guns which lead to start of the war, pretty much spontaneously.

The Americans who fought in the revolution felt they were defending their own country, and were not Englishmen any more.

Furthermore, the colonials were of the opinion that the Crown had no right to confiscate their firearms. And they were correct. Parliament chose not to regard the colonies as equal in rights to England. The colonies had no representation in the Parliament (hence the rallying cry, "No taxation without representation"), and the Parliament didn't seem to think the colonists should have the same rights afforded to British subjects living in England.

So, in reality, the "revolutionaries" then weren't very different from constitutional conservatives today who believe that a day will come when it will be necessary for defenders of the Constitution to take up arms against the federal government. Although some of the revolutionary activists were interested in splitting from England from the git-go, many initially viewed the "rebellion" as nothing more than an effort to claim the rights due to them as loyal subjects of the King. Their attitude didn't shift to secession until the King responded to their petition by imposing more oppressive regulations rather than granting them the rights that should have been theirs anyway.
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RoadKingLarry

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Re: Remember the wedding cake SCOTUS case?
« Reply #31 on: December 15, 2022, 12:14:41 PM »


Each time history repeats itself, the price goes up. ~ Ronald Wright.
If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or your arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen.

Samuel Adams