Author Topic: Israel Under Attack  (Read 73051 times)

WLJ

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Re: Israel Under Attack
« Reply #1625 on: July 10, 2024, 10:18:34 AM »
Yeah, PR and that whack woman governor is actually what I was thinking of.

Seem to also remember after the aid was found sitting in warehouses in PR the MSM lost all interest in the story.
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Ben

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Re: Israel Under Attack
« Reply #1626 on: July 10, 2024, 10:19:33 AM »
Lots of times in non-combat areas however, that part of the mission is given to other agencies due to ......reasons.  Those other agencies almost always underestimate the challenge of logistics in non-permissive environments and muck it all up.

One of the more interesting books that I have read, and that sounds boring but is pretty eye-opening, was "Defeat Into Victory: Battling Japan in Burma and India, 1942-1945" by British Field Marshal William Slim. Sounds boring because he really focuses a lot on logistics, but is eye-opening, because he focuses a lot on the importance of logistics.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0815410220
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cordex

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Re: Israel Under Attack
« Reply #1627 on: July 10, 2024, 11:46:09 AM »
The US Army has entire units dedicated to the art of onward movement, and we spend a whole bunch of effort on it.
I have heard it said a number of times that the primary mission of an effective military is logistics.

Alternately, I've heard it said that the US military is a spectacularly successful logistics company that does a little fighting on the side.

Northwoods

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Re: Israel Under Attack
« Reply #1628 on: July 10, 2024, 02:40:46 PM »
I have heard it said a number of times that the primary mission of an effective military is logistics.

Alternately, I've heard it said that the US military is a spectacularly successful logistics company that does a little fighting on the side.

Tactics and strategy wins battles. Logistics wins wars.
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BobR

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Re: Israel Under Attack
« Reply #1629 on: July 10, 2024, 03:01:51 PM »
Well, that was 300 million well spent, depending on who you ask. I wouldn't even know if would count as a learning experience seeing how this technology is pretty well tried and tested but I will wait for an opinion from out resident pier builder. ;)

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2024/07/09/us-built-pier-will-be-put-back-gaza-several-days-move-aid-then-permanently-removed.html?ESRC=eb_240710.nl&utm_medium=email&utm_source=eb&utm_campaign=20240710



bob

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Re: Israel Under Attack
« Reply #1630 on: July 10, 2024, 03:19:11 PM »
Sure it was decent experience.  We use the Modular Causeway System in large-scale exercises pretty frequently, so we know a bit about it's use, it's always a good experience to do joint operations with different partners.

I'm actually happier now than I was at the beginning.  It was kind of a shitshow getting the causeway and Landing Craft there and operational, but once we got it up the Navy Seabees and Army Mariners did a good job at moving stuff.  That coast is unprotected, and the causeway is sensitive to surf, so they had to take it out and re-install it a couple times, but that's actually within doctrine and planning factors.  They did a decent job (after the first big *expletive deleted*ck up) of getting it into and out of safe harbor, and recovered the tugs they broached on the beach.

What I'm hearing is the decision to pull it completely isn't official yet, but the Army isn't putting it back on the beach until the stuff that's already been delivered has been moved to where it needs to go.  Which makes sense.  There's no need to sit in an operationl condition with several hundred soldiers and sailors twiddling their thumbs when stuff is not moving because of other folks.  Pack the stuff up, pull the LMSR and Landing craft back to somewhere like Rota, let the crews touch land and do some maintenance.  Remembers, most of those crews have been on those boats since they left the East Coast way back when, and even the LSV ain't that big.

If the UN unfucks themselves we can be back on station in a week or so.

So yeah, after a hairy Atlantic crossing and a shitshow of an initial setup the whole operation was a decent work up for the units involved, and will give us useful information for real world utilization of our Logistics Over The Shore capabilities. This is pretty much the longest duration mission we've run with a Modular Causeway System, so that was useful.